Keeping the Construction Industry GoingKeeping the Construction Industry Going


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Keeping the Construction Industry Going

The construction industry has struggled a bit in recent years. This is not because there's not amazing technology out there to make construction easier. There's tons of technology, and it's amazing! Rather, the struggle seems to be that there is a shortage of labor. Many young people are not as interested in working in construction anymore. We hope that we can do our part to change that. In posting on this blog, we hope to reach a wide audience, including young people who may want to work as contractors. There are excellent jobs in the industry, and learning the basics on this blog can set you up for success.

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5 Parts Of Your House To Construct With Reclaimed Wood

Whether you're building a new home, remodeling, or just replacing a roof or floor, reclaimed wood is a worthy building material to consider. Here are five parts of your home to consider constructing (or re-building) with reclaimed wood.

1. Roofing

The highest-quality cedar (old growth cedar) is the best for roofing materials. Old growth is challenging to find new, though, since harvesting it is considered harmful to the environment. However, reclaimed wood can be an eco-friendly way to create a cedar roof on your home. You'll need reclaimed material that's in great shape and still has decades of wear left in it.

2. Flooring

Flooring is more of a no-brainer when it comes to using reclaimed wood. Not only do you have less worry about leaks than with a roof, but a floor is more up-close and personal than a roof. This means you can enjoy the beautiful appearance of aged wood on your floor as you go about your daily activities.

3. Siding

Siding is another outdoor way to use reclaimed wood on your home. While it's not quite as much of a leak hazard as a roof, siding still needs to be made out of the highest-quality reclaimed lumber. You'll likely want to treat it with chemicals as well, since it will be susceptible to termites otherwise.

4. Rafters and beams

If you're going for the farmhouse look or a cabin in the woods aesthetic, exposed beams and rafters inside the home can be an attractive feature. Reclaimed wood can be ideal for these situations, since it's not only beautiful but also a strong and stable material. You can also use large reclaimed lumber for lintels, mantelpieces, and similar focal points in the room.

5. Built-ins

Built-in features such as cabinets and bookshelves can be a beautiful way to showcase your eco-friendly reclaimed wood. Whether in the kitchen, dining room, or living room, these built-in features can either have a natural finish to showcase the wood's grain or a painted finish to blend in with any color scheme.

Reclaimed lumber is a versatile material, and it's not just for homes with a rustic decor style. You can use the wood either with minimal processing or after turning it into planks or shingles. And in addition to the home components mentioned here, you can also use reclaimed wood for outdoor projects such as building a deck.

Contact a reclaimed wood company like Old World Lumber Company today to find out what reclaimed wood projects are available for your next construction or remodeling project.